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Royal Flush (60 Capsules)

Club Price: $23.10
Retail: $29.40
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  • UPC: 69798302062
  • Shipping Weight: 0.1lbs
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Supplement / Product Facts

Ingredients:

These are the ingredients related to Royal Flush (60 Capsules). You can collapse or expand all of them with the Collapse all and Expand all links above.

African Bird Pepper

Cayenne originated in the tropics of the Americas and was introduced to the West in the 16th century, but it is now grown throughout tropical regions in India and Africa as well.  It has been used medicinally for centuries and enjoyed by millions as a flavorful spice. People living in hot climates reportedly consume Cayenne because it helps lower the body temperature because the capsaicin stimulates the cooling center of the hypothalamus.
Harvested during the peak summer months, it is then dried in the shade or used as a fresh fruit. Cayenne has various levels of potency – ranging from the mild Paprika to hotter versions of the fruit. Its primary constituents are: Capsaicin, Carotenoids, Flavonoids, Volatile Oil, and Steroidal saponins in the seeds.

When applied topically, the capsaicin in cayenne depletes the neurotransmitters, which relay pain signals to the brain.  Although the relief is only temporary, this powerful antioxidant has other values, such as helping to reduce platelet stickiness.

Barberry

Medicinal use of barberry dates as far back as ancient Egypt, and it has been used in Indian folk medicine to treat diarrhea, reduce fever, improve appetite, relieve upset stomach, and promote vigor as well as a sense of well-being. Today, it is widely used for medicinal purposes in Iran, including for biliary disorders (such as gallbladder disease) and heartburn.

Barberry and goldenseal ( Hydrastis canadensis ) are often used for similar medicinal purposes because both herbs contain the chemical berberine. Berberine has been shown to inhibit the growth of bacteria in test tubes, and also may help the immune system function better.

Infection and skin disorders

Barberry is used to ease inflammation and infection of the urinary (bladder and urinary tract infections), gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts (sore throat, nasal congestion, sinusitis, bronchitis) as well as candida (yeast) infections of the skin or vagina. Barberry extract may also improve symptoms of certain skin conditions including psoriasis, but further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Diarrhea

Barberry may also be an effective treatment for diarrhea (including traveler’s diarrhea and diarrhea caused by food poisoning). A few studies have suggested that barberry improves symptoms faster than antibiotics, perhaps because it has astringent properties, but that antibiotics may be more effective at killing bacteria in the intestines. Because of the serious consequences associated with bacterial diarrhea, if barberry is used to ease symptoms, it is best to take the herb along with standard antibiotic therapy.

Plant Description

Barberry is a shrub with gray, thorny branches that can grow to about 9 feet tall. Bright yellow flowers bloom between the months of April and June and become dark, drooping bunches of red berries in the fall. The root, bark, and berries are used for medicinal purposes.

What’s It Made Of?

The stem, root bark, and fruit of barberry contain alkaloids, the most prominent of which is berberine. Laboratory studies in test tubes and animals suggest that berberine has antimicrobial (killing bacteria and parasites), anti-inflammatory, hypotensive (causing a lowering of blood pressure), sedative, and anticonvulsant effects. Berberine may also stimulate the immune system. It also acts on the smooth muscles which line the intestines. This last effect may help improve digestion and reduce gastrointestinal pain.

Cape Aloe

Aloes Cape is a palm-like succulent plant native to the Cape Region of South Africa. Aloes Cape is also often grown in cactus and rock gardens in areas having tropical or subtropical climates, and is particularly popular throughout southern California. Aloes Cape is also commonly known as Bitter Aloe, Red Aloe, and Tap Aloe. With leaves having sharp, reddish-brown spines along their perimeters, Aloes Cape can typically grow up to 10 feet in height, and have a spread of 3 feet in diameter. The genus “aloe” is derived from the Greek word for the dried juice of aloe leaves; and “ferox” can be translated as ‘fierce’ or ‘war-like’ referring to the spiny edged leaves of the plant. Plant members of the Aloe family are well-known for their natural high concentration of aloin, and have been the basis for many medicinal topical remedies throughout Europe for centuries. Sailors routinely used this herb on their skin upon injury by the elements, canvas sails, rope burns, and salt water exposure. Early missionaries also spread the healing benefits of Aloes in their work among many primitive communities. Aloes is even mentioned in the Bible for the embalming of the body of Jesus. Cape Aloes is one of the sources of the purgative “bitter aloes”, a strong laxative (not to be confused with Aloe Vera, derived from the plant Aloe vera, and used as an emollient for many skin care products). In parts of South Africa, the bitter yellow juice of Aloes Cape found just below the skin of the leaf has been harvested for over 300 years. The hard, black resinous product is the portion commonly called Aloes Cape, and is used mainly for its laxative properties. Aloes Cape has also proven effective for arthritis support, being a primary ingredient in “Schwedenbitters” and “Lewensessens” which are found in many pharmacies throughout Europe.

http://www.viable-herbal.com/herbdesc5/1aloescap.htm

Cascara Sagrada Bark

Cascara sagrada is the dried, aged bark of a small tree in the buckthorn family native to the Pacific Northwest. The bark is harvested mostly from wild trees in Oregon, Washington, and southern British Columbia. The bark is aged for a year so that the active principles become milder, as freshly dried bark produces too strong a laxative for safe use; it also contains a compound that induces vomiting.

The name cascara sagrada is Spanish for “sacred bark”. Long used as a laxative by Native American groups of the northwest Pacific coast, cascara sagrada bark was not introduced into formal medical practice in the United States until 1877. In 1890, it replaced the berries of the European buckthorn (R. catharticus) as an official laxative. It is still used in over-the-counter laxatives available in every pharmacy in the United States.

Cayenne

Cayenne pepper is a hot red pepper used to flavor dishes; its name comes from the city of Cayenne in French Guiana. Its powdered form comes from the fruit of several cultivated varieties of the Capsicum baccatum and Capsicum frutescens very closely related to bell peppers, jalapenos, paprika, and others. All are related species of the nightshade family (Solanaceae). The fruits are generally dried and ground, or pulped and baked into cakes, which are then ground and sifted to make the powder. Cayenne is used in cooking spicy hot dishes, as a powder or in its whole form (such as in Szechuan cuisine). It is generally rated at 40,000 to 90,000 Scoville Units. It is also used as an herbal supplement, and was mentioned by Nicholas Culpeper in his Complete Herbal. Additionally, cayenne has many beneficial medicinal qualities. Cayenne is a traditional treatment, as well as modern, most notably for the pulmonary and digestive systems. The potent, hot fruit of cayenne has been used as medicine for centuries. It was considered helpful for various conditions: Gastrointestinal tract: including stomachaches, cramping pains, and gas. Diseases of the Circulatory System. It is still traditionally used in herbal medicine as a circulatory tonic (a substance believed to improve circulation). Rheumatic and arthritic pains: Rubbed on the skin it causes, what is termed as, a counterirritant effect. A counterirritant is something which causes irritation to the area that it is applied. This makes it distract the nerves from the original irritation (such as joint pain in the case of arthritis). Active Components: Cayenne contains a resin like pungent substance known as capsaicin. This chemical relieves pain and itching by affecting sensory nerves. Capsaicin temporarily causes the nerves to release various neurotransmitters from these nerves, leading to their depletion. Without the neurotransmitters, pain signals can no longer be sent. The effect is temporary. Capsaicin and other constituents in cayenne have been shown to have several other actions, including reducing platelet stickiness and acting as antioxidants. Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cayenne_pepper

Garlic

For most people garlic is eaten only in small quantities so is more important for its great taste than nutritional value. However, recent research has reported that garlic has the ability to reduce levels of cholesterol in the blood, a property attributed to the sulphur containing substance, allicin. Garlic is also supposed to be a natural antiseptic and to cure colds. Related to the onion, garlic is a small bulb consisting of “cloves”. The cloves should be peeled prior to using. The leaves are grass like and the flower rises from a single central stem. When harvesting or purchasing bulbs, they should be white to off white / light yellow and firm. Avoid bulbs which are mushy or soft. Garlic may be used in many forms such as fresh, dried, processed into supplements and cooking. Actions / Properties: Internally – antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anthelmintic, antiseptic, antiviral, hypotensive-vasodilator, cholagogue, antispasmodic, decreases blood cholesterol, increases HDL, anti-atheromatic, PAF antagonist, increases fibrinolytic activity, hypoglycemic, expectorant, diaphoretic, antioxidant, antitumour, antineoplastic, antimutagenic, diuretic, carminative, emmenagogue. Topcal Uses – antimicrobial, antifungal, expectorant Flavored oils can add excitement to salads, marinades and sauces but infused oils have the potential to support the growth of Clostridium (C.) botulinum. Although the oil by itself does not pose a risk for botulism, the trendy addition of vegetables, herbs and fruits to oils, to make an oil infusion, can make this product potentially unsafe. Vegetables, herbs, and fruits are likely to have some degree of soil contamination, especially those that grow on or under the ground. Soil contamination introduces the possibility that C botulinum spores may be added as an unwelcome ingredient in a recipe. If the produce is put into an anaerobic environment, such as a container of oil, Botulism Toxin can be produced and botulism may result upon consumption. Several cases of botulism involving garlic-in-oil preparations brought this hazard to light in the 1980’s. In 1985, Vancouver, BC, 37 people got botulism from a garlic-in-oil preparation. This was followed by a 1988 laboratory investigation into the survival of and toxin production by C botulinum in garlic-in-oil preparations. In 1989, 3 people in Kingston, NY, became ill, also from a garlic-in-oil infusion. Thus, in 1989 the FDA issued a ruling, ordering the removal from store shelves of all commercial garlic-in-oil preparations that lacked an acidifying agent, followed by a mandate requiring the addition of an acidifying agent (such as phosphoric or citric acid) to all commercial garlic-in-oil preparations. Acid prevents the growth of the C botulinum, so any spores that might be present in an infusion will not be able to flourish and produce toxin. The acid must be added as the recipe is being prepared. Are people aware of the slight, but deadly risk presented when these oil infusions are not prepared properly? Consumers need to understand the potentially life-threatening hazard of oil infusions. Oil infusion recipes can still be tasty and safe as long as the following precautions are clearly stated and adhered to: Wash all soil-contaminated produce before adding it to an oil infusion, Add an acidifying agent such as lemon juice or vinegar to the recipe at the rate of one tablespoon per cup of oil, Keep oil infusions refrigerated in order to retard the growth of any microbes, Discard infusions after one week, or sooner if apparent cloudiness, gas bubbles, or foul odor develop and, When in doubt, throw it out. Source: Food Safety Notebook, Vol. 9, No. 4, April 1998. Source:http://www.colostate.edu/Orgs/safefood/NEWSLTR/v2n4s08.html

Ginger

Ginger was used in ancient times as a food preservative and to help treat digestive problems. To treat digestive problems, Greeks would eat ginger wrapped in bread. Eventually ginger was added to the bread dough creating that wonderful treat many around the globe love today: gingerbread! Ginger ale eventually stemmed from a ginger beer made by the English and Colonial America as a remedy for diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Ginger thrives in the tropics and warmer regions and is therefore currently grown in parts of West Africa, the West Indies, India and China with the best quality ginger coming from Jamaica where it is most abundant. In the United States, ginger is grown in Florida, Hawaii, and along the eastern coast of Texas. Gingerroot is characterized by it’s strong sweet, yet woodsy smell. It is tan in color with white to creamy-yellow flesh that can be coarse yet stringy. Medicine Ginger is not just an important spice. It is used to treat many illnesses in Asia and in the West, particularly nausea and travel-sickness.

Jamaican Ginger Rhizome

amaican Ginger Extract (known in the United States by the slang name Jake) was an early 20th century patent medicine that provided a convenient way to bypass Prohibition laws, since it contained between 70-80% ethyl alcohol by weight.

Jake was not itself dangerous, but the U.S. Treasury Department, which administered the Prohibition laws, recognized its potential as an illicit alcohol source and required changes in the solids content of jake to discourage drinking. The requirement of at least 5 grams of ginger solids per cubic centimeter of alcohol resulted in a fluid that was extremely bitter and difficult to drink. Occasionally Department of Agriculture inspectors would test shipments of Jake by boiling the solution and weighing the remaining solid residue. In an effort to trick regulators, bootleggers replaced the ginger solids with a small amount of ginger and either castor oil or molasses.

A pair of amateur chemists and bootleggers, Harry Gross and Max Reisman, worked to develop an alternative adulterant that would pass the tests, but still be somewhat palatable. They settled on a plasticizer, tri-o-tolyl phosphate (also known as tri-ortho cresyl phosphate or TOCP), that was able to pass the Treasury Department’s tests but preserved jake’s drinkability. TOCP was originally thought to be non-toxic; however, it was later determined to be a neurotoxin that causes axonal damage to the nerve cells in the nervous system of human beings, especially those located in the spinal cord. The resulting type of paralysis is now referred to as organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN).

In 1930, large numbers of jake users began to lose the use of their hands and feet. Some victims could walk, but they had no control over the muscles which would normally have enabled them to point their toes upward. Therefore, they would raise their feet high with the toes flopping downward, which would touch the pavement first followed by their heels. The toe first, heel second pattern made a distinctive “tap-click, tap-click” sound as they walked. This very peculiar gait became known as the jake walk and those afflicted were said to have jake leg, jake foot, or jake paralysis. Additionally, the calves of the legs would soften and hang down and the muscles between the thumbs and fingers would atrophy.

Within a few months, the TOCP adulterated jake was identified as the cause of the paralysis and the contaminated jake was recovered, but it was too late for many victims. Some users recovered full or partial use of their limbs, but for most, the loss was permanent. The total number of victims was never accurately determined, but is frequently quoted as between 30,000 to 50,000. Many victims were migrants to the United States and most were poor and consequently had little political or social influence. The victims received very little in the way of assistance, and aside from being the subject of a few blues songs in the early 1930s, they were almost completely forgotten.

Senna Leaf

Senna is a shrub common to North Africa, reaching up to 3 feet in height with pale green stems. The brittle and grayish-green leaflets and oblong pod fruit are the parts used for medicinal purposes. Since the early 9th and 10th centuries, various Cassia plants have been used as purgatives and laxatives. The Senna Leaf was considered a “cleansing” herb because of its cathartic effect. This herb contains sennosides A and B and has a laxative effect. Source:http://www.herbalremedies.com/senna-leaf-information.html Extract The distilled or evaporated oils of foods or plants (such as nuts, seeds, fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices, bark, buds, roots, leaves, meat, poultry, seafood, fish, dairy foods, or eggs) that are dissolved in an alcohol base or allowed to dry to be used as a flavoring. Food extracts as they are often labeled, are used to add a concentrated flavor to many food dishes, especially baked goods and desserts, without adding additional volume. Available in solid (cubes, granules or powdered), liquid or jelled form, extracts may be labeled as pure, natural or artificial. Pure and natural extracts are governed by laws in many countries that require compliance with procedures that take the extract ingredients directly from the named flavor, such as extracting oils directly from the vanilla bean to make pure or natural vanilla extract. Artificial extracts are flavors that do not necessarily use any ingredients directly from a source named for the extract but instead used combinations of ingredients to arrive at a flavor representative of the named food extract, such as artificial lemon extract. Some of the most widely used extracts include vanilla, almond, anise, maple, peppermint, and numerous solid or jelled extracts such as beef and chicken bouillon or meat demi-glaces. As an example of how the pure and natural extract is made, vanilla extract is created by soaking vanilla beans in water and an alcohol-based solution where it ages for several months, during which time the vanilla flavor is extracted from the bean. Anise extract, a sweet licorice tasting flavoring, is produced by dissolving the oil of anise seeds into alcohol. Grape extract is produced to assist with the wine making process. Compounds from the skin of grapes are extracted and added to the wine in order to impart tannin, color, and body into a wine. The characteristics of the wine can be changed dramatically by the amount of time the wine is in contact with the skins. If the grapes are in contact for too long, the resulting wine may be too potent, or what is sometimes called “over-extracted”. Juices of fruits and vegetables are often extracted as juice extracts to be used similar to other food extracts, as a flavoring when preparing foods. A common utensil for the purpose of extracting lemon juice is available to assist with home recipes requiring a lemon flavoring.

Senna Pod

Senna is a shrub common to North Africa, reaching up to 3 feet in height with pale green stems. The brittle and grayish-green leaflets and oblong pod fruit are the parts used for medicinal purposes. Since the early 9th and 10th centuries, various Cassia plants have been used as purgatives and laxatives. The Senna Leaf was considered a “cleansing” herb because of its cathartic effect. This herb contains sennosides A and B and has a laxative effect. Source:http://www.herbalremedies.com/senna-leaf-information.html Extract The distilled or evaporated oils of foods or plants (such as nuts, seeds, fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices, bark, buds, roots, leaves, meat, poultry, seafood, fish, dairy foods, or eggs) that are dissolved in an alcohol base or allowed to dry to be used as a flavoring. Food extracts as they are often labeled, are used to add a concentrated flavor to many food dishes, especially baked goods and desserts, without adding additional volume. Available in solid (cubes, granules or powdered), liquid or jelled form, extracts may be labeled as pure, natural or artificial. Pure and natural extracts are governed by laws in many countries that require compliance with procedures that take the extract ingredients directly from the named flavor, such as extracting oils directly from the vanilla bean to make pure or natural vanilla extract. Artificial extracts are flavors that do not necessarily use any ingredients directly from a source named for the extract but instead used combinations of ingredients to arrive at a flavor representative of the named food extract, such as artificial lemon extract. Some of the most widely used extracts include vanilla, almond, anise, maple, peppermint, and numerous solid or jelled extracts such as beef and chicken bouillon or meat demi-glaces. As an example of how the pure and natural extract is made, vanilla extract is created by soaking vanilla beans in water and an alcohol-based solution where it ages for several months, during which time the vanilla flavor is extracted from the bean. Anise extract, a sweet licorice tasting flavoring, is produced by dissolving the oil of anise seeds into alcohol. Grape extract is produced to assist with the wine making process. Compounds from the skin of grapes are extracted and added to the wine in order to impart tannin, color, and body into a wine. The characteristics of the wine can be changed dramatically by the amount of time the wine is in contact with the skins. If the grapes are in contact for too long, the resulting wine may be too potent, or what is sometimes called “over-extracted”. Juices of fruits and vegetables are often extracted as juice extracts to be used similar to other food extracts, as a flavoring when preparing foods. A common utensil for the purpose of extracting lemon juice is available to assist with home recipes requiring a lemon flavoring.

Description

Royal Flush help your system to eliminate toxins and poisons and stimulate the large intestine by taking Royal Flush at least once a day at dinner time. The more that you empty your bowels, the healthier that you will be. Regularity keeps toxins and poisons from accumulating and helps your digestive system function better. Lose weight, feel younger and healthier, and prevent constipation and bloating. Do not use this product if you already have diarrhea or severe stomach cramps. Consult with your health care provider for another alternative. Use of Royal Flush on a daily basis will help to increase your energy level and overall feeling of good health.

  • Helps with bowel movement
  • Helps with weight management
  • Helps with anit-aging
  • Helps digestive system
  • Helps eliminate toxins
  • Helps eliminate chemicals, polutions and poisons from our body
  • Helps eliminate bloating
  • If you have ever unsuccessfully battled any of these health concerns, or others, this may be the most important article you will ever read.
  • Helps eliminate constipation
  • Helps eliminate low energy levels

Start by taking one Royal Flush with your evening meal. Increase 1 capsule each evening until the bowels are moving as many times as possible without causing diarrhea.


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