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Menopause (90 Capsules)

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Retail: $33.59
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  • UPC: 697983033257
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Supplement / Product Facts

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menopause

Ingredients:

These are the ingredients related to Menopause (90 Capsules). You can collapse or expand all of them with the Collapse all and Expand all links above.

Black Cohosh Standardized Extract

Grows in wooded areas stretching from the great lakes to the southern Smoky Mountains and westward to the Mississippi River. Black Cohosh was introduced into medicinal use by the Native Americans. Clinical studies support the safety and effective use of the black cohosh to reduce hot flashes, irritability and other conditions associated with menopause.

Calcium

Calcium deficiency is a major problem in the United States. 60% of children under 5 and 40% of children 6 – 11 consume less than their RDA. Of teens, 65% of boys and up to 85% of girls consume less than the recommended amounts. On average, women of all age groups fall far short. These deficiencies, especially in young women, are particularly disturbing because bone built during this time must carry them through the rest of their lives. Calcium is A mineral essential in building and maintaining bones and teeth, as well as in providing efficient muscle contraction and blood clotting. Calcium is found in dairy products, leafy green vegetables (such as spinach, turnip greens and broccoli), sardines and canned salmon with bones and rhubarb. Calcium-fortified orange juice is an excellent source. Deficiency Symptoms include; Loss of bone, and inadequate bone formation that lead to osteoporosis and Vitamin D deficiency. Studies are underway prove possible links between calcium and blood preasure (hypertension), and colon cancer. Toxicity Symptoms: No adverse effects up to 2,400 mg per day for health adults. Generally not well-absorbed higher than 2,400 mg per day. Very high levels may inhibit the absorbtion of other minerals, particularly iron and zinc, and cause constipation.

Chasteberry

Chasterberry is thought to inhibit the excessive production of prolactin, a hormone that regulates breast-milk production. Chasterberry is believed to help restore the hormonal balance as it helps relieve PMS- related complaints such as bloating and depression. Chasterberry is thought to promote fertility and ease the menopausal hot flushes. It may be supplemented in the form of a capsule or tablet.

Dong Quai Powder

Dong Quai A favorite Chinese herb for women, is derived from the root of Chinese angelica. It is used primarily in formulas for its anti-spasmodic and related menstrual functions. Don Quai should not be taken during pregnancy. Source: GNC.com

Gelatin

Gelatin is a protein obtained from animal hides and bones. It has little nutritional value, because it contains a little of several essential amino acids. Gelatin often contains monosodium glutamate (MSG) to which many people have adverse reactions.

Ginger Root Powder

Ginger was used in ancient times as a food preservative and to help treat digestive problems. To treat digestive problems, Greeks would eat ginger wrapped in bread. Eventually ginger was added to the bread dough creating that wonderful treat many around the globe love today: gingerbread! Ginger ale eventually stemmed from a ginger beer made by the English and Colonial America as a remedy for diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Ginger thrives in the tropics and warmer regions and is therefore currently grown in parts of West Africa, the West Indies, India and China with the best quality ginger coming from Jamaica where it is most abundant. In the United States, ginger is grown in Florida, Hawaii, and along the eastern coast of Texas. Gingerroot is characterized by it’s strong sweet, yet woodsy smell. It is tan in color with white to creamy-yellow flesh that can be coarse yet stringy. Medicine Ginger is not just an important spice. It is used to treat many illnesses in Asia and in the West, particularly nausea and travel-sickness.

Ginkgo-Ginko Biloba Leaf Standardized Extract

The Ginkgo tree is the only living representative of the order Ginkgoales, with its earliest leaf fossils dating back to 270 million years ago in the Permian period, so in the era of the dinosaurs it already existed. The earliest record of the use of the leaves as a medicine is said to be mentioned in the Chinese Materia Medica Shen Nung (which should originate from about 2800 BC) as an aid for blood circulation and the lungs. Nowadays Ginkgo is prescribed in Europe and used by many people in the U.S., Canada and other countries for its medicinal abilities. Source: Foodfacts.com Also known as the maidenhair tree, gingko is an herb native to China. Gingko became popular in the 1960’s when technology isolated flavinoids as the active ingredient. These essential compounds help protect against free radical damage. To date, approximately 40 flavanoids have been identified in gingko. In addition to its antioxidant properties, gingko is also used to support increased blood flow to the brain. Source: GNC.com Extract The distilled or evaporated oils of foods or plants (such as nuts, seeds, fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices, bark, buds, roots, leaves, meat, poultry, seafood, fish, dairy foods, or eggs) that are dissolved in an alcohol base or allowed to dry to be used as a flavoring. Food extracts as they are often labeled, are used to add a concentrated flavor to many food dishes, especially baked goods and desserts, without adding additional volume. Available in solid (cubes, granules or powdered), liquid or jelled form, extracts may be labeled as pure, natural or artificial. Pure and natural extracts are governed by laws in many countries that require compliance with procedures that take the extract ingredients directly from the named flavor, such as extracting oils directly from the vanilla bean to make pure or natural vanilla extract. Artificial extracts are flavors that do not necessarily use any ingredients directly from a source named for the extract but instead used combinations of ingredients to arrive at a flavor representative of the named food extract, such as artificial lemon extract. Some of the most widely used extracts include vanilla, almond, anise, maple, peppermint, and numerous solid or jelled extracts such as beef and chicken bouillon or meat demi-glaces. As an example of how the pure and natural extract is made, vanilla extract is created by soaking vanilla beans in water and an alcohol-based solution where it ages for several months, during which time the vanilla flavor is extracted from the bean. Anise extract, a sweet licorice tasting flavoring, is produced by dissolving the oil of anise seeds into alcohol. Grape extract is produced to assist with the wine making process. Compounds from the skin of grapes are extracted and added to the wine in order to impart tannin, color, and body into a wine. The characteristics of the wine can be changed dramatically by the amount of time the wine is in contact with the skins. If the grapes are in contact for too long, the resulting wine may be too potent, or what is sometimes called “over-extracted”. Juices of fruits and vegetables are often extracted as juice extracts to be used similar to other food extracts, as a flavoring when preparing foods. A common utensil for the purpose of extracting lemon juice is available to assist with home recipes requiring a lemon flavoring.

Kava Kava Extract

Kava (Piper Methysticum), a member of the pepper family, is one of the most fascinating of medicinal plants. Native to the South Pacific, a beverage (also called Kava) made from the rootstock of the plant has been used for centuries in ceremonies and celebrations because of its calming effect and ability to promote sociability. The kava beverage is still used today by inhabitants of the island communities of the Pacific including Micronesia, Melanesia, and Polynesia. It is thought that the frequent consumption of kava is partially why these people are referred to as the happiest and friendliest in the world. Extract The distilled or evaporated oils of foods or plants (such as nuts, seeds, fruits, vegetables, herbs, spices, bark, buds, roots, leaves, meat, poultry, seafood, fish, dairy foods, or eggs) that are dissolved in an alcohol base or allowed to dry to be used as a flavoring. Food extracts as they are often labeled, are used to add a concentrated flavor to many food dishes, especially baked goods and desserts, without adding additional volume. Available in solid (cubes, granules or powdered), liquid or jelled form, extracts may be labeled as pure, natural or artificial. Pure and natural extracts are governed by laws in many countries that require compliance with procedures that take the extract ingredients directly from the named flavor, such as extracting oils directly from the vanilla bean to make pure or natural vanilla extract. Artificial extracts are flavors that do not necessarily use any ingredients directly from a source named for the extract but instead used combinations of ingredients to arrive at a flavor representative of the named food extract, such as artificial lemon extract. Some of the most widely used extracts include vanilla, almond, anise, maple, peppermint, and numerous solid or jelled extracts such as beef and chicken bouillon or meat demi-glaces. As an example of how the pure and natural extract is made, vanilla extract is created by soaking vanilla beans in water and an alcohol-based solution where it ages for several months, during which time the vanilla flavor is extracted from the bean. Anise extract, a sweet licorice tasting flavoring, is produced by dissolving the oil of anise seeds into alcohol. Grape extract is produced to assist with the wine making process. Compounds from the skin of grapes are extracted and added to the wine in order to impart tannin, color, and body into a wine. The characteristics of the wine can be changed dramatically by the amount of time the wine is in contact with the skins. If the grapes are in contact for too long, the resulting wine may be too potent, or what is sometimes called “over-extracted”. Juices of fruits and vegetables are often extracted as juice extracts to be used similar to other food extracts, as a flavoring when preparing foods. A common utensil for the purpose of extracting lemon juice is available to assist with home recipes requiring a lemon flavoring.

Licorice Root Powder

The licorice plant (Glycyrrhiza glabra) is used as a medicine around the world. It originated in Europe. Now licorice grows all across Eurasia. It has been used for thousands of years to treat the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts with its soothing and coating action and to treat the adrenals. Concerning the mouth and lungs, its demulcent properties soothe sore throats, while its anti-inflammatory actions help with asthma and bronchitis. Recent studies have found licorice has remarkable rejuvenating effects on the cells of the digestive system and liver and may act as a powerful anti-oxidant in the body

Magnesium Stearate

Used as a confectionery mold release agent. contained in many Nutritional Supplements for its supply of magnesium.

Red Clover

Trifolium pratense (Red Clover) is a species of clover, native to Europe, western Asia and northwest Africa, but planted and naturalised in many other regions.

It is a herbaceous perennial plant, very variable in size, growing to 20-80 cm tall. The leaves are alternate, trifoliate (with three leaflets), each leaflet 15-30 mm long and 8-15 mm broad, green with a characteristic pale crescent in the outer half of the leaf; the petiole is 1-4 cm long, with two basal stipules. The flowers are dark pink with a paler base, 12-15 mm long, produced in a dense inflorescence 2-3 cm diameter.

Red Raspberry Powder

A member of the rose family and a bramble fruit like the blackberry, raspberries are delicately structured with a hollow core. Red raspberry is most often the source of a dietary supplement sold in many health food stores called ellagic acid. In addition to their unique phytonutrient(anti-oxident) content, raspberries are filled with traditional nutrients, primarily in the antioxidant and B vitamin categories. Raspberries emerged from our nutrient ranking system as an excellent source of manganese and vitamin C

Rice Flour

Regular rice flour is a fine, powdery flour made from regular white rice. It’s used mainly for baked goods. Glutinous or sweet rice flour (such as the Japanese MOCHI) is made from high-starch short-grain rice. It’s widely used in Asian cooking to thicken sauces and for some desserts. To Americans, rice is the most familiar food eaten in grain form. It is commonly served as a side dish in American households, but elsewhere it forms the basis for most meals. In fact, half the world’s peoples eat rice as their staple food. In some languages, the word for eat means “eat rice.” In China, Japan, and Southeast Asia, for instance, the annual per capita consumption of rice is 200 to 400 pounds; in the United States, the per capita consumption is about 17 pounds. Though rice is grown on every continent except Antarctica, China produces more than 90% of the world’s rice crop. The United States, because the domestic demand for rice is relatively low, is a major exporter of this grain (although it accounts for only 2% of the world’s rice). Rice can be classified according to size: long-grain, medium-grain, and short-grain. Long-grain rice accounts for about 75% of the domestic crop. The slender grains are four to five times longer than they are wide. If properly cooked, they will be fluffy and dry, with separate grains. Medium-grain rice is about twice as long as it is wide and cooks up moister and more tender than long-grain. It is popular in some Asian and Latin American cultures, and is the type of rice most commonly processed to make cold cereals. Short-grain rice may be almost oval or round in shape. Of the three types of rice, it has the highest percentage of amylopectin, the starch that makes rice sticky, or clump together, when cooked. Easy to eat with chopsticks, it is ideal for dishes like sushi. In addition to the size classification, white rices are labeled according to how they’ve been processed: Enriched rice: Enriched rice has thiamin, niacin, and iron added after milling to replace some of the nutrients lost when the bran layer is removed. As a result, it is higher in these nutrients than brown rice. Converted rice: Converted rice has been soaked and steamed under pressure before milling, which forces some of the nutrients into the remaining portion of the grain so that they are not completely lost in the processing. Enriched parboiled rice is similar to regular enriched rice in terms of thiamin, niacin, and iron, but it has more potassium, folate (folic acid), riboflavin, and phosphorous, though not as much as brown rice. Converted rice takes a little longer to cook than regular rice, but the grains will be very fluffy and separate after they have been cooked. Instant white rice: Instant rice, which actually takes about five minutes to prepare, has been milled and polished, fully cooked, and then dehydrated. It is usually enriched and only slightly less nutritious than regular enriched white rice, but it lacks the satisfying texture of regular rice. Rices are also labeled according to variety: Arborio: Arborio is a starchy white rice, with an almost round grain, grown mainly in the Po Valley of Italy. Traditionally used for cooking the Italian dish risotto, it also works well for paella and rice pudding. Arborio absorbs up to five times its weight in liquid as it cooks, which results in grains of a creamy consistency. Aromatic rices: These are primarily long-grain varieties that have a toasty, nutty fragrance and a flavor reminiscent of popcorn or roasted nuts. Most of these can be found in grocery stores, but a few may be available only at gourmet shops. Basmati: Basmati, the most famous aromatic rice, is grown in India and Pakistan. It has a nutlike fragrance while cooking and a delicate, almost buttery flavor. Unlike other types of rice, the grains elongate much more than they plump as they cook. Lower in starch than other long-grain types, basmati turns out flaky and separate. Although it is most commonly used in Indian cooking, basmati can also be substituted for regular rice in any favorite recipe. It is fairly expensive compared to domestic rice. Glutinous rice (sweet rice): Popular in Japan and other Asian countries, this type of short-grain rice is not related to other short-grain rices. Unlike regular table rice, this starchy grain is very sticky and resilient, and turns translucent when cooked. Its cohesive quality makes it suitable for rice dumplings and cakes, such as the Japanese mochi, which is molded into a shape. Jasmine: Jasmine is a traditional long-grain white rice grown in Thailand. It has a soft texture and is similar in flavor to basmati rice. Jasmine rice is also grown in the United States, and is available in both white or brown forms. Texmati: Certain types of rice–some sold only under a trade name–have been developed in the United States to approximate the flavor and texture of basmati rice. Texmati is one of these; it was developed to withstand the hot Texas climate (there is also a brown rice version). Wehani: An American-grown aromatic rice, Wehani has an unusual rust-colored bran that makes it turn mahogany when cooked. Wild pecan (popcorn rice): Another basmati hybrid, this aromatic rice is tan in color (because not all of the bran has been removed, with a pecanlike flavor and firm texture. Source: http://www.wholehealthmd.com/refshelf/foods_view/1,1523,75,00.html

Silicon Dioxide

Silicon Dioxide is primarily used to prevent caking. Add less than 2% by weight. considered safe A mineral that keeps salt and seasoning blends from clotting, clumping or foaming.

Soy Isoflavones

A substance derived from soy that is also known as phytoestrogens or plant estrogens. Isoflavones are thought to play a role in delivering the health benefits associated with soy protein. These compounds are being extensively studied because they exert physiological effects.

Water

Water is the most abundant nutrient in our body and plays an important transmission function in every body cell and tissue. Sixty percent of our body weight is water. The fact that you can live without food for a long period of time, even months, but live only for a few days without water is true. Under normal conditions, the body releases about one quart of water daily. Therefore, replacement to equal the losses is very important for survival. Dehydration is the most common problem of water imbalance due to water losses and deprivation. The effects of dehydration on nutrition can adversely affect ones health. Dehydration is the major cause of ones diminished ability to perform during endurance activities. Body water is lost through the stomach, respiration, sweat, and the kidneys. It is recomended that 24oz of water a day should be taken. This amount can double or even triple with endurance type exercise. A note about water: More and more evidence shows the benifit of being well hydrated. Studies show that 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated (likely applies to half the world’s population), leading to possible health problems such as fatigue. In 37% of Americans, the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is often mistaken for hunger, leading to over-eating. Even MILD dehydration will slow down one’s metabolism as much as 3%. Bottled Water: Some types of bottled water are not subject to the same regulations as tap water. These are regulated as food products, and their regulations are largely related to sanitary food handling and processing practices. Bottled water manufacturers will provide a detailed report on the quality of their product to consumers who call to request it.

Wild Yam Extract

In the 18th and 19th centuries, wild yam ( Dioscorea villosa ) was used by herbalists to treat menstrual cramps and problems related to childbirth. The subsequent discovery of a substance contained in wild yams revolutionized the pharmaceutical industry. The tubers, or fleshy, root-like parts, of wild yams (not to be confused with the sweet potato yam) contain diosgenin, a steroid-like substance that is involved in the production of the hormone progesterone. Diosgenin has served a key role in the making of hormones and the development of the birth control pill, two of the major advances in plant drug medicine this century. Wild yam continues to be used for treating menstrual cramps, nausea and morning sickness associated with pregnancy, inflammation, osteoporosis, menopausal symptoms, and other health conditions.

Early Americans used wild yam to treat colic; hence, the term colic root. Traditionally, it has been used to treat inflammation, muscle spasms and a range of disorders including asthma. Related species of Dioscorea are used in the Amazon and in central America to treat conditions including fever, urinary tract infections, colds, rheumatism (joint and muscle related conditions), arthritis, hemorrhoids, boils, and dysentery

While the diosgenin found in wild yam created quite a stir in the 1990s as a cure for menopausal disorders and other symptoms of aging in women, the plant itself has no proven hormonal action, nor have any studies shown it to be effective in treating hormone related disorders. It is true that diosgenin can be converted into steroidal compounds, which are then used in the chemical synthesis of progesterone, but this is in the laboratory—not in the human body. There is essentially no scientific evidence of wild yam’s effectiveness in treating menopausal symptoms or osteoporosis. Although many individuals claim relief of symptoms such as vaginal dryness with the use of progesterone creams, some of which contain an extract of Dioscorea villosa , no well-designed studies have evaluated these creams. Moreover, many products that claim to contain natural progesterone actually contain synthetic medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA).

Description

The OxyLife formula for women suffering from the effects of menopause is made up of all natural ingredients like Black Cohosh, Dong Quai, 5-HTP, Red Raspberry, and Wild Yam Extract. When a woman stops menstruating due to menopause she may experience achy joints, hot flashes, changes in sexual desire, insomnia and headaches. This proprietary blend of natural herbs will ease the discomfort and help with the transition into another phase of life. Other dangers of menopause include an increase in cholesterol and risk of heart disease. Other OxyLife products recommended during menopause are Fish/Flax Oil with EPA/DHA, Orachel, and CoQ-10 100 mg.

Menopause Benefits TBA.

As an herbal dietary supplement, take 3 capsules with or between meals.


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